Moving Beyond the 'Keep the Lights On' Mentality

Moving Beyond the 'Keep the Lights On' Mentality

up
52 readers like this

on

February 19, 2014
Chess Piece CIO

By Scott Koegler

Jed Yueh, CEO for Delphix  has a warning for CIOs who don't move beyond the "keep the lights on" mentality of the IT world. He believes it's crucial that IT organizations make the best use of their enterprise data assets. In fact, he has two rules that make sense for CIOs who want to not only succeed in their positions, but soar above their competition.


Yueh says, "Data is the currency of the modern datacenter. CIOs run and maintain the applications and supporting IT systems for the business-the internal data bank. Many IT organizations can barely stay afloat, struggling to maintain stability and availability of applications and systems. As a result, they fail to execute on the projects that matter to the business. Those that fail to execute on a timely basis will forever lose ground to their competitors, threatening the future of their businesses as markets evolve and competitors emerge from new quarters (e.g. Honeywell thermostats vs. Nest).


"The rules for IT have changed. Rule number one: today's CIOs need to unlock their data with innovative new technologies like big data and virtualization. Big data technologies and data virtualization platforms help companies collect and make more valuable use of their data currency, which would otherwise be trapped in legacy platforms. It's no longer sufficient to keep your data stuffed in old IT mattresses. Big data can effectively store vast amounts of data. Virtualization provides fast, flexible, and efficient access to data-like a network of ATM machines.


"Rule number two: CIOs need to re-invest their data in projects that accelerate and differentiate their business. With the rise of ubiquitous Internet access and mobile devices, businesses have an unprecedented ability to reach and interact with their customers, employees, and partners. Those who invest their data resources wisely will reap the dividends, expanding faster into international markets or new opportunities, and responding nimbly to regulatory or market changes.


"Those who fail to invest will watch their businesses slowly crumble. IT is the data bank. It needs to be run like a bank. Unlock data with innovative technologies. Reinvest data to accelerate and differentiate the business."
Do you feel that Yueh's advice is accurate? As a CIO for your company, how do you make sure that you go above and beyond the "keep the lights on" mentality?

Scott Koegler is the community manager for Enterprising CIO. He practiced IT as a CIO for 15 years. He also has more than 20 years experience as a technology journalist covering topics ranging from software and services through business strategy. He has written white papers and directed and published video interviews.

Comments 0
Scott Koegler practiced IT as a CIO for 15 years. He also has more than 20 years experience as a technology journalist covering topics ranging from software and services through business strategy. He has written white papers and directed and published video interviews.

Harvard Business Review: IT Talent Crisis: Proven Advice from CIOs and HR Leaders

CIOs: We welcome you to join the conversation

Related Topics

Submitted By Nano Serwich
August 02, 2016

"We are in an Information Revolution," declares Mahesh S. Kumar in this article published by the Harvard Business Review. He compares how the earliest automobile manufacturers were "vertically integrated" to how we use big data in companies today, and how in the future we will need to create ecosystems of software to mine data that is useful.

Submitted By Carla Rudder
November 10, 2015

A recent Harvard Business Review Analytic Services report found that close to half of all respondents (49 percent) said their department occasionally or frequently initiates IT projects with little

Submitted By Carla Rudder
October 12, 2015

When asked what a CIO's most important contribution to the business is over the next three years, only 21 percent of survey respondents in a recent Harvard Business Review study said that it

Recent Tweets

| Follow @4Enterprisers